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The facts about the proposed Great Koala National Park
Grade timber properly to take ‘Timber to Market’
A forest scientist's view of the recent Australian bushfires
There’s wood pulp in our food - and we like it
Taking the N out of NIMBY

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Dobbo's blog

The facts about the proposed Great Koala National Park

On the back of the disastrous Koala SEPP, the Liberal National Party Government has again forgotten its rural constituents and the promises made by North Coast Nationals that they would not support a Great Koala National Park.

Want to know some facts about Koalas, the GKNP and its potential impacts on North Coast communities?

This is apresentationI gave to the Mid North Coast Joint Organisation, which includes Port Macquarie-Hastings Council, Bellingen Shire Council and Kempsey Shire Council.

As you might imagine, I did not get a standing ovation from the Mayor of Bellingen or the General Manager of Destination North Coast, who are both pushing for the GKNP.

Grade timber properly to take ‘Timber to Market’

Grade timber properly to take ‘Timber to Market’

Grade timber properly, avoid selling in bulk, use registered forestry experts and research thoroughly – those are some of the tips that forest growers should keep in mind as they take their timber to market. Source: Philip Hopkins

That was the message from Steve Dobbyns, a forestry consultant with decades of experience, who was a key speaker at a ‘Timber to Market’ session late last month. 

The seminar, organised by the Institute of Foresters of Australia and Australian Forest Growers, was sponsored by VicForests.

A forest scientist's view of the recent Australian bushfires

This was written (quite brilliantly) by a good friend and fellow forest scientist. He beautifully dismantled the rhetoric around the cause of this summer’s bushfires. I wish I’d written it.

I know I can be accused of bias by supporting a fellow forester who is trying to bring some realism and pragamatism into the debate on bushfires in Australia. My plea, however, is for those of you without forest management experience to be aware of the real situation. I ask that you are very careful what sources of information you rely on to help frame your views in this debate.

There’s wood pulp in our food - and we like it

You won’t find “wood pulp” listed plainly on any food ingredient labels, but don’t be so quick to turn your nose up at the idea. The powdered cellulose derived from wood pulp already can be found in several shredded or grated cheese products, keeping them from clumping in the packaging when exposed to moisture. And now food scientists are researching how incorporating more wood-based products, mostly pulp and dust, can enhance how other foods feel and keep. 

Finnish researchers have found that the hemicellulose extracted from the pulp of birch trees and then added to many yogurts—the actual name of that ingredient is “xylan”—is one way to keep yogurt feeling smooth.

Taking the N out of NIMBY

How can it be an environmentally, or indeed ethically, defensible position to cross our arms and simply import greater and greater volumes of product from far-flung corners of the globe because we aren’t growing sufficient of our own timber on shore?

Chief Executive Officer of AFPA, Mr Ross Hampton said, "The world needs much more, not less, of this sustainable, renewable and truly green resource. And it needs more of it from Australia.” AFPA is also placing advertisements in regional newspapers in key plantation areas such as the Green Triangle in South Australia and Victoria, central tablelands and southern NSW, south east Queensland, and southwest WA.

Humble pine

Humble Pine; the unsung hero of the Australian timber industry

Rebuilding Vanuatu's forestry

When Cyclone Pam blew in to Vanuatu on March 13 it set back development of this proud, independent island nation. Villagers are very dependent on agriculture and forestry to raise small amounts of cash. The trees that they grow in their gardens supply nuts and fruit, but also occasional sales of timber that are used for local construction or to pay secondary school fees. Australian forestry has had a long tradition of working with Vanuatu, and this appeal is being supported by the Institute of Foresters of Australia and Foresters Without Borders.

How the internet began

In ancient Israel, it came to pass that a trader by the name of Abraham Com did take unto himself a healthy young wife by the name of Dorothy. 

Dot Com was a comely woman, large of breast, broad of shoulder and long of leg.

Indeed, she was often called Amazon Dot Com.

And she said unto Abraham, her husband, "Why dost thou travel so far from town to town with thy goods when thou canst trade without ever leaving thy tent?"

Abraham did look at her as though she were several saddle bags short of a camel load, but simply said, "How, dear?

Manscaping for REAL men.....!!


The Most Ancient and Magnificent Trees From Around the World

The Most Ancient and Magnificent Trees From Around the World msn.com

The Bowthorpe Oak is a massively thick, millennium-old tree in Lincolnshire, England that once was rumored to hold three dozen people in its enormous, hollowed-out trunk. Beth Moon photographed the leafy giant some 15 years ago and was struck by its solemn nobility and overwhelming presence. 

Thus began a pilgrimage that would take her around the world to document the planet’s most ancient trees.

The series and corresponding photo book,