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There’s wood pulp in our food - and we like it
Taking the N out of NIMBY
Humble pine
Rebuilding Vanuatu's forestry
How the internet began

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Dobbo's blog

There’s wood pulp in our food - and we like it

You won’t find “wood pulp” listed plainly on any food ingredient labels, but don’t be so quick to turn your nose up at the idea. The powdered cellulose derived from wood pulp already can be found in several shredded or grated cheese products, keeping them from clumping in the packaging when exposed to moisture. And now food scientists are researching how incorporating more wood-based products, mostly pulp and dust, can enhance how other foods feel and keep. 

Finnish researchers have found that the hemicellulose extracted from the pulp of birch trees and then added to many yogurts—the actual name of that ingredient is “xylan”—is one way to keep yogurt feeling smooth.

Taking the N out of NIMBY

How can it be an environmentally, or indeed ethically, defensible position to cross our arms and simply import greater and greater volumes of product from far-flung corners of the globe because we aren’t growing sufficient of our own timber on shore?

Chief Executive Officer of AFPA, Mr Ross Hampton said, "The world needs much more, not less, of this sustainable, renewable and truly green resource. And it needs more of it from Australia.” AFPA is also placing advertisements in regional newspapers in key plantation areas such as the Green Triangle in South Australia and Victoria, central tablelands and southern NSW, south east Queensland, and southwest WA.

Humble pine

Humble Pine; the unsung hero of the Australian timber industry

Rebuilding Vanuatu's forestry

When Cyclone Pam blew in to Vanuatu on March 13 it set back development of this proud, independent island nation. Villagers are very dependent on agriculture and forestry to raise small amounts of cash. The trees that they grow in their gardens supply nuts and fruit, but also occasional sales of timber that are used for local construction or to pay secondary school fees. Australian forestry has had a long tradition of working with Vanuatu, and this appeal is being supported by the Institute of Foresters of Australia and Foresters Without Borders.

How the internet began

In ancient Israel, it came to pass that a trader by the name of Abraham Com did take unto himself a healthy young wife by the name of Dorothy. 

Dot Com was a comely woman, large of breast, broad of shoulder and long of leg.

Indeed, she was often called Amazon Dot Com.

And she said unto Abraham, her husband, "Why dost thou travel so far from town to town with thy goods when thou canst trade without ever leaving thy tent?"

Abraham did look at her as though she were several saddle bags short of a camel load, but simply said, "How, dear?

Manscaping for REAL men.....!!


The Most Ancient and Magnificent Trees From Around the World

The Most Ancient and Magnificent Trees From Around the World msn.com

The Bowthorpe Oak is a massively thick, millennium-old tree in Lincolnshire, England that once was rumored to hold three dozen people in its enormous, hollowed-out trunk. Beth Moon photographed the leafy giant some 15 years ago and was struck by its solemn nobility and overwhelming presence. 

Thus began a pilgrimage that would take her around the world to document the planet’s most ancient trees.

The series and corresponding photo book, 

Diver finds 10,000 year old hidden forest

A shocked diver has found an incredible 10,000-year-old pre-historic forest under the North Sea and experts believe it could have once stretched as far as Europe. Diver Dawn Watson, 45, discovered the remarkable 'lost forest' when she was diving just 300 metres off the coast of Cley next the Sea, Norfolk. 

She found complete oak trees with branches measuring eight metres long under the sea and experts believe they have been hidden off the coast of Norfolk since the Ice Age. The forest is believed to have become exposed following the stormy weather last winter.

Pulp undies for Christmas?

Just in time for holiday gift giving, lovers of wood and wood products will enjoy MeUndies, underwear made from Lenzing Modal, a material extracted from the European beech tree.

According to the Lenzing website, the material is CO2 neutral and made using Edelweiss technology, which is based on oxygen-based chemistry. More than half of the beech wood used by Lenzing is from Austrian forests.

Distributed by MeUndies, the beech-based undergarments are offered in both men's and women's styles. According to the company's website, "the low rigidity of the beechwood fibres allow for unparalleled, natural softness", while the cellulosic properties of the fibre "naturally inhibit odour-causing bacterial growth".

Jamax nominated in the 2014 Telstra Australian Business Awards

Jamax Forest Solutions has been nominated in the prestigious 2014 Telstra Australian Business Awards and is entered in the Micro Business category. Not sure who by but thank you. Mind you, after the 20-30 hours it took to complete the entry, if I ever find ...out, I might turn around and nominate their business next year. All jokes aside, the process does provide a good opportunity to navel gaze at your business, where it's heading and how to improve what you do.